Take the Tour at NDSCS!

Take the Tour!By Sarah Hoffbeck

What sets NDSCS apart from other two-year colleges? For one, we truly care about our students’ success. Not only do we provide an affordable way to earn an education, we cater to your student’s needs and wants, offering almost everything you would find at a 4-year college.

Discover the possibilities at NDSCS

  • Participate in a Wahpeton Campus Tour and check out our Residence Halls, Student Center, Academic Buildings and more!
  • Visit the NDSCS-Fargo location and discover the possibilities for day or evening programs.
  • Set-up a time to chat with specific departments and get the inside scoop on programs that interest your son or daughter.
  • Visit with program staff about admission information.
  • Learn about partnerships and programs offered through industry partners.

So what are you waiting for? Click here to schedule a tour today to see if your student belongs at NDSCS. Individual campus tours are given Monday-Friday at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m.

Questions? Contact the Enrollment Services office in Wahpeton at 800-342-4325 or the Fargo Programs Representative at 701-231-6919.

Student Health 101

Student Health 101By Sarah Hoffbeck

Did you know that NDSCS provides an interactive online student magazine every month, for free? It’s called Student Health 101 and gives college students a way to stay up-to-date on the latest health and wellness issues prevalent on most college campuses today.

Student Health 101 is written for students and often by students, and includes articles on topics such as body image, healthy relationships, sexual health and responsibility, money management, sleep habits and much more.

January’s edition features a variety of articles and information including my favorite entitled, “13 Apps for a Healthy 2013.” We all love our smartphones and this list includes must-have apps on healthy eating, rest and relaxation, and exercise.

In addition to Student Health 101, NDSCS also provides a free monthly companion piece for parents called The Parent Perspective, which provides a summary of the topics covered in that month’s student version as well as a link to check out the student version. Check out January’s Parent Perspective via this link: readsh101.com/ndscs-pp.html.

Remind your student to look for a new edition of Student Health 101 every month, which can be accessed from the NDSCS Student Life webpage at ndscs.edu/studentlife.

Happy reading!

Scholarship Deadline Feb. 1 at NDSCS

NDSCs ScholarshipBy Sarah Hoffbeck

Has your college-bound student recently applied to the North Dakota State College of Science? Perhaps you have a son or daughter returning to campus next year. With things finally settling down in the New Year, now is the time to make sure that all of those applications and massive amounts of paperwork you’ve been putting off, finally get completed and turned in. And just in case you’ve spaced it, the 2013-14 NDSCS Scholarship Application is due Friday, February 1, 2013.

Scholarships at NDSCS are sponsored by contributions from friends, alumni and the business community. To apply for a scholarship, you must complete a Scholarship Application by February 1, 2013. Applications received after February will still be accepted, but only considered if current funds are still available.

So how much could your son or daughter potentially receive in a scholarship from NDSCS? Your student will automatically qualify for a general NDSCS academic scholarship if the following criteria are met:

  • An ACT score of 25 combined with a 3.6 GPA = $1,000
  • An ACT score in-between 22-25 with a GPA in the 3.2-3.6 range = $500

To fill out a Scholarship Application online, simply go to ndscs.edu/scholarship-application and complete the form. The Scholarship Application can also be found within the NDSCS Application Packet, located in the Enrollment Services Office.

NDSCS encourages students to apply for outside scholarships as well. Currently, Enrollment Services has information on 35 external scholarship opportunities. To find out more about these scholarship opportunities, check out ndscs.edu/scholarships/external.

Your student may also have luck creating a profile on a popular scholarship search website such as scholarships.com or collegenet.com.

In any event, be sure to get your 2013-14 NDSCS Scholarship Application turned in no later than Friday, February 1. If you have any questions, or for more information, contact Enrollment Services at 701-671-2208.

New Year, New Resolutions, New You

By Sarah Hoffbeck

With 2013 just begun, now is the perfect time to reflect and perhaps set some New Year’s resolutions that might actually be worth keeping.

Whether you’re an NDSCS college student, parent or grandparent, young professional or soon-to-be retiree, here are the top seven New Year’s resolutions worth setting in 2013:

  1. Learn to say “No.” Life is fast-paced and only getting faster. With more and more demands on your plate, learn to say “no” early on and don’t feel guilty for it. Know your limits and stick to them. Don’t commit to more than you can actually deliver.
  2. Don’t Procrastinate. If you don’t struggle with procrastination, then congratulations, you are one of the few in this world! Time is often a prized possession. Learn to practice good time management skills and strive to become a bit more organized.
  3. Use your Calendar. If you’re not a fan of the old-school calendars that you actually have to write in, utilize the calendar on your cell phone, computer, or other tech device. Make notes of due dates for monthly bills, class schedules, important work meetings, etc.
  4. Make a Budget. Commit to creating a monthly, or weekly budget, and stick to it! Then live only within the means of your budget.
  5. Manage your Stress. While I realize that we all have some stress, learning how to manage it and not letting it take over is key. Learn what makes your stress level lower—it could be exercise, eating a piece of chocolate, visiting the spa, or even just remembering to take a deep breath of air.
  6. Make Healthy Choices. Eat better, exercise more, sleep more and drink responsibly. Start with small and achievable goals and don’t feel bad if you slip-up.
  7. Reflect on your Social Media Habits. Are you a Facebook fanatic who posts frantically, or one tweet away from being a Twitter addict? If your social media habits are wreaking havoc on your real relationships, then it may be time to detox. Take a break, or at least set limits on how much time a day is reasonable to be active on social media.

Whether you pick one or two from this list, decide to tackle all seven, or just decide to set some of your own personal resolutions, good luck and stick with it.

Happy New Year!

Start the New Year out Right: Complete the FAFSA Today

FAFSABy Sarah Hoffbeck

With the month of January just around the corner, pretty soon you’ll become bombarded with information pertaining to tax season. And if you’re the parent of a college-aged student, now is also the time when the dreaded FAFSA must be completed.

Never heard of FAFSA? FAFSA stands for Free Application for Federal Student Aid and is basically a document you fill out to see if your student qualifies for federal college loans and/or grants.

The office of Federal Student Aid provides grants, loans and work-study funds for college and offers more than $150 billion each year to help millions of students pay for higher education. Processing over 21 million FAFSA submissions a year, the office of Federal Student Aid, which is part of the U.S. Department of Education, is the largest provider of student financial aid in the United States.

Who Gets Aid
Worried your student won’t qualify for aid? Most students are eligible for some type of aid. Here are some of the basic eligibility criteria for the federal student aid program.

  • You must have financial need
  • You must be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen
  • You must be enrolled in an eligible degree/certificate program at your college

Types of Aid
Financial aid is money to help pay for college and can come from a variety of sources, including grants or loans. While a grant is basically free money and does not need to be repaid, a loan is money you borrow and must pay back with interest. The following are common grants and loans your student may qualify for after completing the FAFSA:

Filling Out the FAFSA
While it’s true that filling out the FAFSA is a bit time-consuming, it is time well spent. Check out this video to learn how to complete your FAFSA today:

If you or your student has any questions regarding financial aid at NDSCS, please feel free to contact the Financial Aid office by email at ndscs.fin.aid@ndscs.edu or by phone at 701-671-2208.

Open Enrollment at NDSCS

Open EnrollmentBy Sarah Hoffbeck

Is your student thinking about applying to take college courses starting in January? If so, now is the perfect time to start the application process at NDSCS.

Although NDSCS has an open enrollment policy, applications still need to be processed. Not familiar with open enrollment?

Open enrollment, also known as the open admission policy or open door policy, basically means that anyone with a high school diploma or its equivalent is qualified to take classes at NDSCS.

Open enrollment colleges made their first splash in the 1970s when the City University of New York became the first institution of higher education to adopt an open enrollment policy. Something must have clicked, because open enrollment colleges are scattered all over the United States and are becoming more and more popular.

Benefits of Open Enrollment

  • Allows a wider range of students with an opportunity to obtain higher education.
  • Streamlined admissions policy.
  • Attractive to nontraditional or adult students. Often an adult student who has been out of the educational loop for a number of years may not have all the documents, materials and other items necessary for admission into a closed enrollment college.

Applying to NDSCS is Easy

Fill out an Application for Admission with a $35 non-refundable application fee and include the following:

  • High school transcript or GED.
  • Official college transcripts from any other college attended.
  • Proof of immunization for measles, rubella and mumps, and meningitis for applicants 21 and under.
  • An ACT of SAT score for applicants under age 25.

For more information on the application process at NDSCS visit ndscs.edu/admissions, check out the Application Packet online, or contact the Enrollment Services Office at 701-671-2521.

Why Cramming for Finals is not a Good Idea…and that’s Final

By Sarah Hoffbeck

With the 2012 holiday season just around the corner, finals season will soon be upon your college student as well. Nothing like ushering in the holiday spirit by staying up all night cramming for that final exam the next day.

While we’ve all heard that cramming for finals is not optimal for really learning and retaining information, who hasn’t pulled an all-nighter, cramming in bits of information until your brain is about to explode? While tempting, falling into the trap of putting off studying for one more night until finally there are no more nights left, is a bad habit that needs to be whipped in the bud!

Here are a few tips to not-so-subtly drop to your college-aged son or daughter over the next few weeks, while they’re home for hunting season or Thanksgiving, to get them thinking about final examinations.

  • Do they know what will be on the final exam? Will it be a cumulative test, or a test covering recent topics? Will it be open-book, or a take-home exam? If your college student gives you that deer-in-the-headlights look, tell them to ask their professor about what will be on the final exam or how they should best prepare for the final. Most professors are truly interested in their students’ success and will give some insight into how to study for the exam.
  • Stay away from major distractions while studying. This includes TV, social media (yes, that means Facebook and Twitter) and video games. Turn everything off, or at least down. One glance at Facebook and you could potentially lose hours of study time.
  • Quiz yourself. I know it sounds lame, but make flashcards or enlist the help of your roommate or younger brother or sister. New research shows that being tested is what really helps you retain information and not the hours of cramming.
  • Sleep! Make sure to sleep. Overnight cramming sessions are not ideal. Just imagine dragging yourself into class on an hour of sleep and a few pots of coffee. A hazy nightmare. If you put aside an hour or two every night now, you will save yourself in the long run.

Finals week at NDSCS in both Wahpeton and Fargo is the week of December 9-15, 2012. For additional study tips or for study help, check out the Academic Services Center located on the second floor of the NDSCS Mildred Johnson Library in Wahpeton. The Enrichment Tutoring Services Room, located at the NDSCS-Fargo location, provides five hours of tutoring daily, Monday through Friday.

Well, it’s now or never—good luck on preparing for finals week Wildcats! Study hard and do well.

Get Out & Rock the Vote!

By Sarah Hoffbeck

Tuesday, November 6 = Election Day

Are you ready to vote this Tuesday, November 6? Whether you’re a college student or a member of the community, now is the time to make your vote count. I know we’ve all heard it before, but as Americans we do have the right to vote. If you’re like me, politically uninformed, you may be struggling to decide on whom to vote for… To learn more about the presidential candidates, and perhaps figure out which way you sway, go to abcnews.go.com/. You can even take a quiz to find out who your top 2012 presidential candidate match is.

Student Voting Tips

  • If you’re a college student who is a North Dakota resident and living away from your permanent residence, you can vote by absentee ballot. An absentee ballot allows you to vote either in person at your county auditor’s office before Election Day, or by mail.
  • If you attend college away from your North Dakota residence and you live on or off campus, you may vote in the precinct, or voting area, of your college residence.

Other Voting Tips

  • To register to vote in North Dakota you must be a U.S. citizen, a resident of North Dakota, 18 years of age or older on Election Day and a precinct resident for 30 days preceding the election.
  • If you vote at the Poll on Election Day remember to bring your I.D. requirements.
  • Not sure where to vote in Wahpeton? Go to wahpeton.com to locate your ward boundaries and poll locations.
  • To view a sample ballot, go to vip.sos.nd.gov/ and type in your house number and zip code.

Good luck and see you at the Polls!

Sleep Yourself Smarter

zzzzsBy Sarah Hoffbeck

With the first semester of classes at NDSCS over halfway done, students (and perhaps even faculty and staff) are probably starting to feel the affects of lack of sleep. Think about it…staying up to all hours of the night working on homework, well, mostly homework, running across campus to catch that 8 a.m. class, dragging through the rest of your day, wondering how to get that next fix of caffeine. No wonder your student is a walking zombie when they do finally come home. And chances are the only thing they’re interested in doing while they’re at home is sleeping the day away.

Healthy sleep habits will become your friend, that miracle drug that will get you through the day. Whether you’re a student, parent, or employee, we all know we could use a few more zzzzs.

Healthy sleep habits? Who has time, right? Well, studies show that making time is imperative. The typical college student only sleeps about 5-6 hours per night, when in fact, the average sleep requirement for any college student is well over 8 hours.

Here are a few tips to hopefully start you on your track to sleeping more:

  • Make a schedule and stick to it. If you know you can’t handle an 8 a.m. class, don’t register for one. For those of you who are already in the workforce, whenever possible, try to get to the office at the same time every day. Set a schedule that allows you to get up every day at a similar time. The same goes for setting a bedtime. Going to bed at a different time every night is wearing on your body.
  • Don’t oversleep. I know…we all LOVE to sleep in. Unfortunately, oversleeping  will cause you to be even sleepier throughout the day.
  • Take a power nap! Even a 20-minute power nap will recharge your system, making it possible to actually stay awake and maybe even learn something in class. Or, if your workday is truly dragging, try a power nap over the lunch hour.
  • Monitor your alcohol consumption. While alcohol may make you fall asleep faster, it typically results in a lower quality of sleep and can cause you to wake up several times throughout the night.
  • Turn off your cell phones, computers, tablets and any other pieces of distracting technology. And if you can’t bear to turn them off, at least turn the volume down.
  • Block out any distractions. That includes turning the TV off. If you need some white noise, try a fan. Maybe even invest in one of those sleep masks to block out light.

Well, good luck on your quest to more sleep. Here’s to a less sleep-deprived community and NDSCS campus!

Sweet dreams!

Tweet, Text or Talk…Staying in Touch with your College Student

By Sarah Hoffbeck

“LOL,” “BTW,” “OMG,” “TTYL.”  Translations: “Laugh out  loud,” “By the way,” “Oh my god,” and “Talk to you later.” The list is practically endless. These popular text messages have taken abbreviations to a whole new level and are standard in any teen’s arsenal of Social Mediatexting vocabulary.

Chances are you’ve already hopped on the texting train…but in today’s fast-paced society of perpetually changing technology, Twitter, Facebook and Skype are also great ways to stay in touch with your college-aged son or daughter.

Never heard of Skype? It’s a quickly growing form of communication on the Internet. Basically, if you have a phone number and access to the Internet, you can talk or even video-chat for free! Check out this video tutorial on all things Skye: http://video.about.com/frugalliving/How-to-Use-Skype-.htm.

While it’s great to hear their actual voice, lets face it—between running back and forth from the dorm to class to work, and trying to have a social life, a text or post on Facebook from your student is the next best thing.

So grab your phone, laptop or iPad and hop to it. Keep in touch with your son or daughter through social media. Tweet it, Facebook it, blog it… Whatever floats your boat! And for those of you who might be a bit technically challenged, don’t worry. All it takes is a little practice. Before you know it, you’ll be texting and tweeting away like a pro.

Stay connected with NDSCS and your student.

Facebook www.facebook.com/NDSCS

 twitter.com/ndscswildcats/

CUL8R (See you later) :)